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Venezuela's President Nicolas Maduro announced that the country's main opposition parties will be banned from taking part in next year's presidential election. It comes amid his ruling that the Socialist Party won at least 90-percent of the 335 mayoral seats in Sunday's local elections. Al Jazeera's Daniel Schweimler reports from Caracas. - Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe - Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish - Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera - Check our website: http://www.aljazeera.com/
 
Benjamin Netanyahu says Palestinians must quote "get to grips" with the reality that Jerusalem is the capital of Israel in order to move towards peace. The Israeli Prime Minister made the comments in Paris during a meeting with the French president. When asked about discontent across the region over Trump’s decision, including harsh criticism from Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, Netanyahu said he would not be given morality lectures by the Turkish leader. Al Jazeera's Natacha Butler reports from Paris. - Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe - Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish - Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera - Check our website: http://www.aljazeera.com/
 

Santa Barbra threatened as California fires rages on

More evacuation orders have been issued in southern California as wind gusts continue to spread huge wildfires threatening coastal towns. Firefighters are warning the Thomas Fire near Santa Barbara could become the worst in the state's history. Al Jazeera's Rob Reynolds reports from Carpinteria, California. - Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe - Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish - Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera - Check our website: http://www.aljazeera.com/
 
Protesters in the Philippines have taken to the streets of the capital to mark World Human Rights day. They say their country is sliding into a dictatorship under President Rodrigo Duterte's rule. Thousands of people, including children, have died since Duterte declared his so-called "war on drugs". Al Jazeera's Jamela Alindogan reports from Manila. - Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe - Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish - Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera - Check our website: http://www.aljazeera.com/
 

Anti-nuclear group ICAN receives Nobel Peace Prize

The International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons (ICAN) has received the 2017 Nobel Peace Prize in Oslo. The Nobel Committee praised ICAN for drawing attention to the humanitarian consequences of using nuclear weapons. The group is urging all nuclear powers to adopt and sign a UN treaty to ban their use. Al Jazeera's Charlie Angela reports from Oslo. - Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe - Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish - Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera - Check our website: http://www.aljazeera.com/
 

Kashmiris 'fed up' with India's human rights abuses

As the world observes the UN sponsored Human Rights Day, rights violations continue to be a major issue in Indian-administered Kashmir. Since 1989, nearly 70,000 people have been killed in violence that separatist leaders say the United Nations has done too little to prevent. For the past year, the remote, northern region was gripped by widespread protests, following the killing of a prominent rebel commander. In the crackdown that followed, more than 100 protesters were killed, thousands were arrested and hundreds were blinded by police who shot at civilians with iron pellets. Al Jazeera's Imtiaz Tyab reports. - Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe - Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish - Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera - Check our website: http://www.aljazeera.com/
 

Has ISIL been defeated in Iraq?

In 2014, ISIL announced it was taking over nearly all of Iraq and Syria. But three years later and billions lost, Iraq's Prime Minister Haider Al Abadi says his military has defeated the armed group. It's been a long road to get to this point. The battle for Mosul alone took months. Almost a million people had to flee, and thousands left behind were killed. More than eight thousand homes were reportedly destroyed. And that was just one of several Iraqi cities once controlled by ISIL. What does this mean for Iraq's future? Presenter: Sami Zeidan Guests: Ali Al Dabbagh - Former Spokesman for the Iraqi Government. Tallha Abdulrazaq - Researcher at the University of Exeter’s Strategy and Security Institute. Ahmed Rushdi - Adviser to the Speaker of the Iraqi Parliament. - Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe - Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish - Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera - Check our website: http://www.aljazeera.com/
 
Protests over the US recognition of Jerusalem as Israel's capital have largely stopped in the city, after a heavy Israeli crackdown. Israeli authorities have carried out extensive ID checks and cracked down on any use of the Palestinian flag. Al Jazeera's Harry Fawcett report from Occupied East Jerusalem. - Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe - Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish - Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera - Check our website: http://www.aljazeera.com/
 

#AJNobel

An Exclusive live interview with Nobel recipient the international Campaign to abolish Nuclear Weapons(ICAN) Subscribe to our channel http://bit.ly/AJSubscribe Follow us on Twitter https://twitter.com/AJEnglish Find us on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera Check our website: http://www.aljazeera.com/
 
Anger about the US decision to recognise Jerusalem as Israel's capital is escalating, with protests in several major cities around the world. There have been violent confrontations in the occupied Palestinian territories for four days, but, on Sunday, demonstrations were held across three continents. Al Jazeera's Charlotte Bellis reports. - Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe - Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish - Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera - Check our website: http://www.aljazeera.com/
 
Palestinian Christians have expressed their frustration with Donald Trump’s decision to move the US embassy from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem. Many of them spoke out during Sunday services in Gaza. More than 200,000 Palestinian Christians live in the occupied Palestinian territories and Israel. Al Jazeera's Bernard Smith reports from Gaza. - Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe - Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish - Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera - Check our website: http://www.aljazeera.com/
 
About 20,000 people died when former Zimbabwean President Robert Mugabe ordered a military campaign against the rival liberation movement, ZAPU. An unknown number of civilians were among the dead in a series of massacres between 1983 and 1987. The new president, Emerson Mnangagwa, and former military chiefs appointed to his cabinet are implicated in the events. Al Jazeera's Andrew Simmons reports from Matabeleland. - Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe - Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish - Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera - Check our website: http://www.aljazeera.com/
 

Survivor of Hiroshima atomic bomb attack speaks out

On Sunday, the Nobel Peace Prize will be awarded to the International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons (ICAN) at a ceremony in Oslo. ICAN has fought for a global treaty banning nuclear weapons, which now has more than 50 countries as signatories. Ahead of the ceremony, Al Jazeera has been exploring the nuclear capabilities of countries around the world, and their impact on citizens. Hiroshi Harada was six years old when the US dropped an atomic bomb on Hiroshima, in Japan. It was the first and only time that nuclear weapons have been used in war. He tells us his story and the significance of the Hiroshima Peace Memorial (Genbaku Dome), the only structure left standing when the bomb exploded. - Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe - Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish - Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera - Check our website: http://www.aljazeera.com/
 
A beauty salon in South Sudan has become a refuge for many widows of war. They are among the thousands who are the sole breadwinners after their husbands were killed during the country's devastating four-year conflict. Polygamy is common in South Sudan and the war has left behind hundreds of thousands of widows who lost their husbands, many of whom are the sole breadwinners for their children. Al Jazeera's Hiba Morgan reports from the town of Akobo, where widows focus on supporting their families to overcome their grief. - Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe - Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish - Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera - Check our website: http://www.aljazeera.com/
 
Television programming in Spain has undergone a transformation over the past decade - changes driven partly by economics and partly by politics. Ever since the banking crisis of 2008, the country has been in a semi-constant state of political upheaval. A series of corruption scandals, inconclusive general elections and, more recently, Catalonia's run at independence have kept Spaniards glued to their televisions and pundits talking 24/7. That has given rise to a wave of political talk shows that the Spanish call tertulias. These programmes meet two important criteria, they provide political flashpoints that audiences seem to like and they're cheap to produce. However, the discussion is not always balanced. Public broadcasters, in particular, have been known to engineer talk show panels to promote their government's agendas. "Political debates seem to have adopted the practice of gossip shows to get record audiences, and it looks like it's working," says Marina Gonzalez Sanz, the University of Seville. Behaviour that previously would have been unthinkable is now accepted, like biased interventions by moderators or the use of insults during prime time. "It is true that, lately, politics are as widespread on television as cooking or football shows with practically the same kind of structure," explains TV3 presenter Xavier Graset. "But that isn't negative. Debating is a good thing. And it has its roots in our literary circles and cafe culture. Also, this format has been very successful because it is much cheaper to produce." After the 2008 economic recession that saw housing prices collapse and Spain's GDP plummet, media outlets were forced to find cheaper forms of programming. By 2011, the recession had spawned an anti-austerity movement, that took to the streets and infiltrated the TV studios. Some channels saw an opportunity, producing tertulias that were political – with an element of showbiz. The industry was in crisis and found a winning formula. Since the crisis, "the hours people spend watching TV has greatly increased" says professor Joan Lopez Alegre, University Abat Oliva. "Why? People don't have enough money to go out for dinner - sales of frozen pizza have rocketed. Appetite for politics has rocketed, too. A debate guarantees you a bigger audience than a blockbuster film or a good series, and on a smaller budget." Tertulias aren't just Spain's new political battleground. They're a launching pad. In 2013, a conservative TV channel, Intereconomia, signed up a relative unknown leftist professor of politics to counter right-wing voices on its best-known tertulia "El Gato al Agua". Within a year, Pablo Iglesias became the third-most recognised commentator in the country, and the new political party he co-founded, Podemos, finished third in its debut election. Political tertulias tend to fail Spanish audiences in the area of plurality, a problem affected publicly funded channels during the debate over Catalonian independence. TVE is Spain's national public broadcaster. TV3 is its equivalent in Catalonia. The heads of both channels are appointed by politicians. TVE's tertulias were loaded with anti-independence voices, while TV3's tilted the other way, providing only token unionist voices, heavily outnumbered by the other side. "In tertulias, there are always two ideological flanks, but they are uneven," explains Sanz. "About a quarter of tertulias invite a majority of speakers of one ideology, and just one representative of the counter-ideology, the so-called 'useful idiot'. In the rest of the tertulias, the moderator clearly supports one side. So while it looks like there is plurality, in fact, there isn't." However, not everyone thinks this is a bad thing. "Political debates and political communications in Spain have changed completely because of the TV tertulias and, moreover, there's no going back to the past. That is good for democracy," says Alegre. "Spain is a country where we have always said that politicians are our main problem. But nevertheless, we have ended up with politicians having a presence in all channels at all hours. We have gone from being a country of bullfighters and flamenco singers, so to say, to be a country of footballers and politicians." Contributors: Cesar Gonzalez Anton, head of news, La Sexta Marina Gonzalez Sanz, University of Seville Joan Lopez Alegre, professor, University Abat Oliva Xavier Graset, presenter, TV3 More from The Listening Post on: YouTube - http://aje.io/listeningpostYT Facebook - http://facebook.com/AJListeningPost Twitter - http://twitter.com/AJListeningPost Website - http://aljazeera.com/listeningpost
 
As Christians in South Africa head to church on Sunday, a Religious Rights Commission is taking steps to regulate all places of worship. It's to stop what it calls the commercialisation of religion and other dangerous practices. The Commission for the Promotion and Protection of the Rights of Cultural, Religious and Linguistic Communities – known as CRL for short - says vulnerable people are being taken advantage of by being promised blessings, for a price. It wants all religious leaders to be registered to stop what it describes as the commercialization of religion and other dangerous practices. Al Jazeera's Tania Page reports from Pretoria. - Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe - Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish - Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera - Check our website: http://www.aljazeera.com/
 
More than a million lined the Champs Elysees on Saturday for the funeral procession of the man known as the 'French Elvis'. Johnny Hallyday died on Wednesday at the age of 74. He sold more than 100 million albums, but was relatively unknown outside the country. At the historic Madelaine church, family, friends and past leaders gathered for a service. On the steps outside, France's young president Emmanuel Macron paid tribute. Al Jazeera's Natacha Butler reports from Paris. - Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe - Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish - Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera - Check our website: http://www.aljazeera.com/
 
Donald Trump's attendance at an opening of a Civil Rights Museum in Mississippi has sparked a boycott by Black leaders. Many of them stayed away from the launch, accusing the president of racial division. The National Association for the Advancement for Colored People, or NAACP, the most storied civil rights organization in America, had asked Trump not to come, saying Trump has done nothing to support black Americans as president. Al Jazeera's Gabriel Elizondo reports from the city of Jackson. - Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe - Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish - Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera - Check our website: http://www.aljazeera.com/
 
On Sunday, the Nobel Peace Prize will be handed to the International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons at a ceremony in Oslo. The campaign has fought for a global treaty banning nuclear weapons, which now has more than 50 countries as signatories, but the five most powerful nations at the UN do not support the treaty. Al Jazeera's James Bays reports from the UN. - Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe - Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish - Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera - Check our website: http://www.aljazeera.com/
 
Venezuelans go to the polls on Sunday to vote for the mayors of 335 municipalities. The ruling party is expected to sweep the board, given a boycott by most opposition parties, who say the electoral system is biased in favour of President Nicolas Maduro. Many Venezuelans say politics takes a backseat to the struggle to make ends meet and have become disillusioned with all the parties. Al Jazeera's Daniel Schweimler reports from Caracas. - Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe - Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish - Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera - Check our website: http://www.aljazeera.com/
 

The science of capturing carbon - TechKnow

The devastating effects of climate change are everywhere. Now, the fight to save the planet is taking an innovative turn. What if scientists could offset dangerous greenhouse gas levels by capturing CO2 from the atmosphere and putting it to use? This episode looks at two project that aim to capture CO2 and convert it into useable products. The first would combine basalt and CO2. Basalt is naturally highly reactive with CO2; when the two meet, they undergo a series of exchanges that culminate with the carbon precipitating out as a solid whitish substance, similar to limestone. The second project uses cyanobacteria to convert CO2 into bio products such as fuels, bioplastics, oils and flavourings. - Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe - Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish - Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera - Check our website: http://www.aljazeera.com/
 
That's the reaction to Trump's declaration from the Arab League at an emergency session in the Egyptian capital Cairo, following Donald Trump's recognition of Jerusalem as Israel's capital on Wednesday. The foreign ministerial-level meeting of Arab states follows criticism of the US president's move by governments around the world, and widespread protests in several countries. The Arab leaders also said US action is illegal according to international law. Al Jazeera's Imtiaz Tyab explains. - Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe - Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish - Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera - Check our website: http://www.aljazeera.com/
 

Inside Story - How corrupt is Ukraine?

He was the president of Georgia, then a governor in Ukraine, and now he's in jail on hunger strike. The arrest, and re-arrest, of Mikhail Saakashvii in Kiev has stirred protests which evoke memories of the Ukrainian revolution three years ago. Saakashvili's supporters say his detention is based on lies and they want him let go. They already freed him once earlier this week - from a police van. Tuesday's dramatic scenes saw a former president being dragged across a roof. Police arrested him for allegedly conspiring with Russia against the Ukrainian state. Saakashvili then escaped custody, before police tracked him down again on Friday. The former Georgian leader says his arrest is politically motivated. But is it really? Presenter: Sami Zeidan Guests: Alexander Korman - Former Head of the Public Council and First Deputy Chairman of Public Council to the Ministry of Foreign Relations of Ukraine. Sergey Markov - Former Russian MP & spokesman for President Vladimir Putin. Lilit Gevorgyan - IHS Global Insigh tanalyst and principal economist covering Russia & Ukraine. - Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe - Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish - Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera - Check our website: http://www.aljazeera.com/
 
Dozens of Palestinians have been injured and arrested during the fourth day of protests, against the US decision to declare Jerusalem the capital of Israel. In occupied East Jerusalem, Israeli forces fired stun grenades and tear gas as they charged through a crowd of peaceful demonstrators at one of the city's busiest shopping streets. Al Jazeera's Alan Fisher reports from the Occupied East Jerusalem. - Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe - Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish - Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera - Check our website: http://www.aljazeera.com/
 

Intifada through the eyes of a musician

Ramzi Abu Redwan was a child when he took part in the first Intifada 30 years ago. This is his story. - Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe - Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish - Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera - Check our website: http://www.aljazeera.com/
 

Israel's 54 year old nuclear reactor a safety risk

The Dimona reactor, which began its life in 1963, is one of Israel’s most closely guarded secret installations. A study made public last year found more than 1500 fissures within the reactor core. Israel is estimated to have more than a hundred nuclear warheads, the plutonium for which comes from its Dimona reactor. On Sunday, the Nobel Peace Prize will be handed to the International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons at a ceremony in Oslo. Al Jazeera’s Harry Fawcett reports from West Jerusalem. - Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe - Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish - Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera - Check our website: http://www.aljazeera.com/
 

Mikhail Saakashvili re-arrested in Ukraine

Mikhail Saakashvili was re-arrested in Ukraine, four days after his supporters freed him from a police van. The former President of Georgia has gone on hunger strike in a Ukrainian detention centre, according to his lawyer. He says the charges against him are politically motivated. Al Jazeera’s Peter Sharp reports. - Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe - Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish - Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera - Check our website: http://www.aljazeera.com/
 
When the annual Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) summit in Kuwait ended abruptly this week, so too, did hopes of a breakthrough in the bloc's biggest crisis in decades. The meeting was the first since Saudi Arabia, Bahrain, the UAE and Egypt cut trade and diplomatic ties with Qatar in June, after accusing it of supporting "terrorism", allegations that Qatar denies. The GCC summit concluded abruptly on Tuesday instead of Wednesday, with delegates leaving Kuwait after a closed session. But even before the summit officially kicked off, divisions were very much on display. The UAE announced it had formed a new economic and military partnership with Saudi Arabia that would be separate from the GCC. And Saudi Arabia, the UAE and Bahrain decided not to send their respective leaders to Kuwait. So is the GCC trading bloc still living up to its name? And how is pressing the pause button on economic cooperation affecting the oil-rich region? According to Ayham Kamel, head of MENA at the Eurasia Group, the GCC bloc operates in name only now. "Virtually, we have an organisation that is able to do very little. There's no consensus on the major issues - not on foreign policy, economics, so I think it will remain there in name, but the effectiveness has gone down to almost zero." The Gulf crisis "really has created the first step towards partial disentigration of the union ... I don't think you're going to hear any headlines on cooperation or any strategy from the GCC any more," says Kamel. On whether the GGC is committed to diversifying their economies away from oil dependency, he says, "there was serious committment towards having some sort of fiscal rebalancing process across the GCC that maintained the balance between the Gulf economies." However, Kamel believes that "you have to expect some delays, some structural problems because these states have not really introduced any complicated form of taxation at anytime. At this stage, we get a state-centric approach and some states move forward quite quick, but others feel compelled to put them on the sidelines. I think in the Qatar case, we'll probably see some delays because of the economic and political crisis with the GCC, so it would be more prudent to delay that and its a likely direction." Also on this episode of Counting the Cost: The plastic economy: This week, the world's top decision-making body on the environment, the UN Environment Assembly, passed a resolution on zero tolerance to plastic pollution in the ocean. But it's non-binding, so the onus falls on individual citizens across the globe to make it happen. Catherine Soi reports from the summit in Nairobi. SMS anniversary: It has been 25 years since the world's first text message was sent. And that's something to talk about, given the way the humble SMS has evolved into an entire messaging industry, as Paul Brennan explains. Peace diamonds: The diamond trade currently still relies on paper-based certification, but that's changing. De Beers, the world's largest supplier of diamonds, says it wants to use something called 'blockchain technology' to provide a traceable record for its gemstones. The platform will trace the diamonds' route through the value chain, from mine to consumer. Gabriel Elizondo reports from New York. More from Counting the Cost on: YouTube - http://aje.io/countingthecostYT Website - http://aljazeera.com/countingthecost/
 
An attack by rebel fighters in the Democratic Republic of Congo has killed 14 United Nations peacekeepers. All the peacekeepers were from Tanzania. Five Congolese soldiers also died in the attack. The UN is blaming a Ugandan group called the Allied Democratic Forces. Al Jazeera’s Charlotte Bellis reports. - Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe - Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish - Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera - Check our website: http://www.aljazeera.com/
 

Myanmar army accused of targeting Rohingya children

Myanmar's army is being accused of deliberately targeting Rohingya children who are escaping a military crackdown in Rakhine State. A nine year old girl has told Al Jazeera how she survived being shot three times as she crossed into Bangladesh after Myanmar soldiers shot and killed both her parents. More than 625,000 Rohingya are seeking sanctuary in Bangladesh. Al Jazeera’s Charles Stratford reports from the Thangkali Refugee Camp, Bangladesh. - Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe - Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish - Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera - Check our website: http://www.aljazeera.com/